Trail closure - Lower Macley Trail

EDIT: The trail has reopened as of February 10, 2012.


Lower Macley Trail, in Forest Park, is closed due to flooding and downed trees. Lower Macley trail connects Lower Mackley park to the larger Forest Park. The trail meets up with Wildwood at the stone house.

Lower Macleay Trail is shut down between Lower Macleay Park and the Stone House at the Wildwood Trail Junction, said Mark Ross, a spokesman for Portland Parks and Recreation.

Not only did trees fall across the trail, he said, but flooding washed out entire sections of the path. It's likely the trail will be closed for at least two weeks.

All of Wildwood Trail is open, he said.

This was as of January, 20, 2011. Watch Forest Park Conservancy's Facebook page for updates.

Edit: More Forest Park trail closures.

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New Forest Park Map

The current issue of Portland Monthly has a wonderful map of Forest Park. I'm definately going to use it to plan some hikes and bike rides for the All Trails Challenge.

The ATC is a challenge to hike all the trails in Forest Park by October of 2011. The event is a fundraiser for The Forest Park Conservancy. Join the event or sponsor my team.

My ATC mileage is now 25.96/80.97

On a related note: I said I was going to start blogging again to track my ATC progress. Unfortunately I let my self get behind, and then I injured my hand. Typing is difficult for me so I haven't gotten back to it.

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New parking and admission rates

WTA has the low-down on new parking and admission rates throughout Washington and Oregon.

Notably, the National Forests have some new rules.

All USFS trailheads in Washington and Oregon with developed (toilet, picnic table) charge a user fee - this includes most trailheads in the Cascades and Olympics. A list of sites is here.

National Forest Recreation Day Pass: $5. Allows you to park at trailheads. You can purchase several day passes ahead of time and write the dates on them as you use them. The pass is available at National Forest offices and visitor centers, via private vendors or online. Note that WTA and some other vendors listed do not carry day passes.
Northwest Forest Pass: $30. An annual pass honored at all Forest Service day-use or entrance fee sites in Washington and Oregon. The pass is available at National Forest offices and visitor centers and via private vendors or online. Passes may also be purchased at the WTA office or via our online link.
Interagency Annual Pass: $80. This pass provides entrance to all Forest Service, national park and other federal site charging fees for one year. Purchase at a National Forest office or online - details are here.
Interagency Senior Pass: $10. This is the best deal around. This is a lifetime pass that is honored nationwide at any federal site charging entrance fees. Check out the details here.
Mount St. Helens National Monument: Mount St. Helens, managed by the USFS, charges on a per-person fee basis. Entry to the Coldwater or Johnson Ridge sites are $8 per person for those 16 and older (free for kids). They will honor Interagency Annual and Senior passes for named pass-holders, and a Northwest Forest Pass will gain entry for one person.

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Wildwood - Arboritum walk

Date: 4/10/11
Distance: 4ish miles
Time: 2.5 hours
Difficulty: Easy
Weather: Chilly and overcast and drizzling
Maps: Hoyt Arboretum map is online here.
My Route:
Starting at mile 0 of the Wildwood trail, follow Wildwood just over 3 miles to Burnside Rd.
Turn around, returning on Wildwood,
Right turn on White Pine and meander back to the parking area via White Pine, Hemlock and Wildwood trails.
Notes:
I wouldn't really recommend this exact route. It was more of a guideline, than an actual route. We took some detours, wrong turns and a side trip to the restroom along the way. Our mission was to complete the southernmost section of the Wildwood trail to kick off the All Trails Challenge. Everything after that was extra.

It's early April and was a chilly drizzly day, which made for muddy trails and not too many people.

The trails in Hoyt Arboretum and confusingly signed. That doesn't much matter on a leisurely stroll in the the park, since it's pretty hard to get too lost. But we were on a mission to walk the full length of the Wildwood within the arboretum/Washington Park and so we had to do some back tracking to make sure we were on the correct trail.

Spring is springing in Hoyt Arboretum! Birds were singing, flowers (daffodils, trillium, azaleas) and trees (cherry, plum, magnolia) were blooming. And dog poop bags were everywhere. What is going on with the dog poop bags lately? Why do so many people leave them on the side of the trail? I just don't understand the logic of someone who is conscientious enough to pick up their dog's poo and then just leaves the bag sitting on the ground. It was shocking how many bags we saw.

Trail Head:

View PDX Day Hiker in a larger map
View PDX Day Hiker in a larger map

Restrooms and water available at Visitor's center in the Arboretum.
What I said about these trails before: Hoyt Arboretum Hikes, Forest Park Hikes
Other resources for this and other nearby hikes:
Hoyt Arboretum
Guidebooks:
Hoyt Arboretum 4-mile self-guided hike

This is part of my All Trails Challenge, a challenge to hike all the trails in Forest Park by October of 2011. The event is a fundraiser for The Forest Park Conservancy. Join the event or sponsor my team.
My ATC milage is now 3.06/80.97

Have you been on this or a nearby trail? Please share your experience.

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Forest Park Conservancy's All Trail Challenge

I'm participating in The All Trails Challenge, a benefit for Forest Park Conservancy.

Forest Park Conservancy is a great organization dedicated to maintaining trails and habitat in Forest Park. The challenge is to hike (or bike or run) ALL the trails in the park - all 80 miles!

The all-new ATC2011 is a seven-month-long trail-a-thon: participants (“All Trails Challengers”) may register online at alltrailschallenge.org beginning March 3, 2011 and then begin recruiting friends, family and colleagues to sponsor their participation. Challengers share links to a personal, customized fundraising page with friends and family, who then make a sponsorship donation online! It's that easy.

Each Challenger will be given access to the tools they need to complete the Challenge and raise funds for the preservation and protection of Forest Park, including a personal fundraising web page for soliciting online donations, access to online navigation resources, discounts on books, maps, and trails resources, and coupons from area outfitters. Challengers can form teams with co-workers, spouses and friends, or walk all 80 miles solo. The Conservancy’s business partners and other supporters will provide valuable incentives for high-performing fundraisers.
I'll be re-opening the blog to document my team's and my progress as we check off the trails through the coming year.

Registration is still open and will be for several months. I encourage all of PDX's hikers to support this great cause through participation or sponsoring participants. I feel weird asking for donations, but you all know what a great cause this is. Here is my team's fund raising page.

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Blog update

I have pretty much abandoned PDX Day Hiker.

I'd rather enjoy the outdoors without creating an additional chore to do at then end of each trip.

So long.

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Frangrance Lake

Date: May 16, 2010
Distance: about 5 miles
Elevation Gain: about 1000 ft
Time: 2.5 hours
Difficulty: Easy/Moderate
Weather: Cloudy and Overcast
Map
My Route:
We followed the well marked signs from the trail head to the lake, around the lake and back with a detour to the view point.
Notes:
A nice quiet walk, not far from Bellingham. The trail is very well maintained and sufficiently signed to not cause any confusion.

The trail goes up up up, making it less easy than I had expected. There are a number of benches along the way to stop and rest.


Despite being on the coast, the viewpoint offers the only view of the water. In other areas, the forest hides the bay.

Trail Head:

View PDX Day Hiker in a larger map
Water and restrooms available in campground and day use areas of the park.
What I said about these trails before: Larrabee State Park Hikes
Other resources for this and other nearby hikes:
Fragrance Lake Trail on WTA's site
Washington State Parks

Have you been on this or a nearby trail? Please share your experience.

Trail head information and more resources for this trail